Karolina Lanckorońska: aristocrat, scholar, and patron

Countess Karolina Lanckorońska is best known for her memoirs titled Those Who Trespass Against Us: One Woman’s War Against the Nazis (‘War Memoirs’ in Polish). In the memory of Polish historians, whom she often generously supported, she went down in history as a scholar and patron of science. She was the first woman in Poland…



Władysław Konopczyński: an archive afficionado, record-holder, and biographer of a thousand Poles

Władysław Konopczyński was a great figure in Polish historical science. Polish culture owes monumental works to him, for whom archives and libraries throughout Europe had no secrets. He led an interesting and somewhat controversial life across several epochs. by Tomasz Siewierski   Warsaw-Lwów beginnings It seemed that Władysław, born in Warsaw in 1880, would spend…


Szymon Czechowicz: Old Polish Raphael, master of minuet in painting

Politics and culture go their own ways. Fragmented Italy, plunged into feuds, gave the world the Renaissance. Spain suffered defeat after defeat in the 17th century, but was in its golden age in the field of literature and art. At the end of the reign of Jan III Sobieski, the Polish-Lithuanian state fell into utter…


The denarii of Bolesław I the Brave. Poland’s first currency

Until recently, it was believed that Mieszko I, Poland’s first ruler, had minted the kingdom’s first coin, however, this claim has since been refuted. Mieszko’s denarius was indeed minted by a Mieszko, although in fact it was Mieszko II, the grandson of the founder of the Polish state. by Wojciech Kalwat   If we are…


Like a Phoenix from the Ashes

The former seat of Masovian dukes and Polish-Lithuanian monarchs has remained a symbol of Polish statehood for centuries. It was the venue of parliamentary sessions and witnessed triumphs (such as the homage paid to King Sigismund III by the Russian Tsar taken prisoner), but also shameful events, such as the consent of corrupt and intimidated…


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